Using Intel Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on a hackintosh

If you use a hackintosh you have to choose your hardware carefully to make sure it is supported by macOS. You can get Wi-Fi + Bluetooth card used by Apple as I did in my desktop, but sometimes you do not have much choice.

When I turned by old Thinkpad T440s into a hackintosh I bought a Wi-Fi dongle because the Intel AC7260 Wi-Fi + Bluetooth card is not supported by macOS, no Intel cards are.

Later I discovered and open-source project that aims to make Intel Wi-Fi and Bluetooth work on macOS and I was able to make the Intel AC7260 card work, no dongles needed.

Bluetooth driver

To get Intel Bluetooth working you need IntelBluetoothFirmware. It is a macOS kernel extension that that uses firmware binaries from Linux to make Bluetooth work.

Make sure your specific Intel card is supported, download the latest release and use the two kexts; IntelBluetoothFirmware.kext and IntelBluetoothInjector.kext. If you use Clover just copy them to EFI/Clover/Kexts/Other.

Make sure you do not use any of AirportBrcmFixup, BT4LEContinuityFixup, BrcmBluetoothInjector, BrcmPatchRAM3 so you do not create a conflict.

After reboot Bluetooth will appear in System Preferences and you will be able to find and pair your Bluetooth devices.

Wi-Fi driver

To get Intel Wi-Fi working you need itlwm. Similar to IntelBluetoothFirmware it is a macOS kernel extension using firmware from Linux.

Make sure your specific Intel card is supported and download the latest release. The release includes two kexts; itlwm.kext and itlwmx.kext. The itlwmx.kext is for use with the Intel X cards, like Intel X200, the itlwm.kext is for all the older cards like mine.

Networks management

When loaded, itlwm.kext makes your Intel Wi-Fi card available as an Ethernet card, not as a Wi-Fi card. This means you will not get the classic macOS user interface for connecting to Wi-Fi networks.

You need to either configure your Wi-Fi networks either manually or use a custom Wi-Fi management app.

To configure the Wi-Fi networks manually open itlwm.kext and find Info.plist. If you open Info.plist you will see a section called IOKitPersonalities:itlwm:WiFiConfig with 4 Wi-Fi networks configured. Just change it to your networks configuration, providing your networks names and passwords and save the changes.

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Adding Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to hackintosh to enable Apple-specific features

When I started with my hackintosh I did not have Wi-Fi or Bluetooth support in it. I used Ethernet to connect to my home network and it worked fine, I had no need for Wi-Fi.

Later I wanted to use more “Apple-specific” features, so I started looking for how to make them work with my hackintosh.

Bluetooth

Adding Bluetooth support to a hackintosh is quite easy, you just need to buy any of these USB adapters:

All of them are natively supported in macOS, no extra drivers are needed.

GMYLE Bluetooth 4.0 Adapter

I bought the GMYLE Bluetooth 4.0 Adapter, found it on German Amazon.

Thanks to adding Bluetooth support I got:

  • Ability to use Bluetooth keyboards, speakers, headphones
  • SMS messages showing on macOS
  • incoming phone calls showing on macOS

The SMS relying feature was really nice, especially when needing to copy security codes sent by SMS by services that do not support 2FA via TOTP.

Justa s a side note, iMessage worked right from the start, Bluetooth is not needed for it.

Wi-Fi

Wi-Fi required for some Apple-specific features

The one thing that I was missing was AirDrop. I started taking screenshots regularly on my iPhone during development and testing and there was no easy way to move them to the hackintosh without AirDrop.

To make AirDrop and additional features like Handoff work you need not only Bluetooth but also an internal Wi-Fi card.

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Switching my Hackintosh from NVIDIA to AMD because of Mojave

When I turned my computer into a Hackintosh about 2 years ago I was using an NVIDIA GTX 660 as my GPU and it worked without any additional drivers because of built-in support in Sierra. When I later bought a 4K display I could not make the GTX 660 drive the display at 4K@60Hz in macOS, although it worked well in Windows.

NVIDIA web drivers

I decided I needed a more powerful GPU anyway to play games on the new display in Windows so I bought a GTX 1060. It worked in Sierra and High Sierra thanks to the so called web drivers; GPU drivers provided my NVIDIA on their website. Without the web drivers you get no hardware acceleration, no 4K as maximum resolution, just one display working … the whole setup is basically unusable.

Those web drivers are version specific, every time the macOS build number changes after some update you need new ones (or to use a script to patch the previous ones). This is a bit annoying, you typically have to wait a few days after every macOS update for new drivers to become available and update then.

No web drivers for Mojave

When a new major version of macOS comes out, like Mojave, you cannot use web drivers for the previous version. NVIDIA needs to release new drivers and they now cannot do it without cooperation from Apple. Citing from the NVIDIA Developer forums

Developers using Macs with NVIDIA graphics cards are reporting that after upgrading from 10.13 to 10.14 (Mojave) they are experiencing rendering regressions and slow performance. Apple fully controls drivers for Mac OS. Unfortunately, NVIDIA currently cannot release a driver unless it is approved by Apple.

Apple basically blocks NVIDIA from releasing web drivers for Mojave, that is the reason the drivers are not out even now half, a year after Mojave release. If you are for example an iOS developer, XCode 10.2, the next version of Xcode, will only run on Mojave and you will not be able to use it unless you upgrade.

AMD GPUs in Mojave

Mojave natively supports some GPUs from AMD. You can buy a RX 560, RX 570, RX 580, Vega 56 or Vega 64 and it should work out of the box, no extra drivers needed. You not even have to install Lilu or Whatevergreen.

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Using CloneZilla for regular hackintosh backups

Update: With macOS Catalina I switched to bootable daily incremental backups.

If you are a macOS user you may be used to Time Machine as the standard for backups. Time Machine is fine if you want to backup your files and configuration, but if for example your disk dies or your hackintosh completely breaks with some bad update, there are better and faster ways to get it up and running again.

Requirements

Basically everything comes down to your backup requirements. These are mine

  • full backup of the macOS SSD including EFI with Clover
  • backups that can be restored without any additional configuration to the current macOS SSD or a new one in case of a disk failure
  • no need for the ability to restore single files (all work data are in Git and Dropbox)
  • reasonable backup and restore speed

Looking at different backup solutions I chose Clonezilla. It is not exactly the most user-friendly solution, but it is a very powerful one if you know what you are doing.

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My experience running a hackintosh

A few months ago I decided to take part in an iOS project. The first problem I needed to solve was to be able to run macOS Sierra and XCode. I did not really want to buy an overpriced MacBook without function keys or and underpowered Mac Mini. Especially when I own a more than 3 years old desktop computer that is still usable for all my needs. A few iOS developers I know recommended I go the Hackintosh way.

Hackintosh

Hackintosh is PC that runs macOS. This configuration is not supported by Apple but it is possible if you have the right hardware since Apple has been using a fairly standard PC hardware for the last couple of years. For example you cannot us any new GeForce 10X0 (Pascal) because there are no Apple computers with those new graphic cards so there are no drivers yet (NVIDIA has released new drivers supporting all the Pascal graphic cards). But if you have an older GeForce like me or an integrated one, you will be fine. The tonymacx86.com website, basically the central hub of all the Hackintosh information, regularly publishes a buying guide that can be useful if you want to buy a new computer and install macOS on it.

If you do not wish to install macOS directly on your hardware you can run it in a virtual machine, but the performance will never be very good. Some people do it for Xamarin development when they just need to compile their project and run the simulator, so there are a few tutorial on how to do it. There is also an interesting blog post series about a virtual hackintosh. I tried running macOS in WMWare on my Thinkpad T440s but the performance was not good.

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